nprmusic
nprmusic:

50 years ago today, pianist and composer Andrew Hill recorded Point of Departure, a jazz record that still feels vital and futuristic. 
Two years before Hill passed away, he appeared on Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz in 2005. In many ways it’s a miraculous piece of radio not for the least of which his colorful, angular playing but also because Hill spoke with a sometimes debilitating stutter. But here Hill sounds so relaxed at the piano and with McPartland on the other side of the microphone — NPR arts editor Tom Cole once told me it was the most clear conversation had ever heard with the pianist. After 7 years of producing Piano Jazz for NPR.org, it remains my favorite episode. — Lars
Listen: Andrew Hill on Piano Jazz
Photo: Jimmy Katz

Ditto what I say up there. 

nprmusic:

50 years ago today, pianist and composer Andrew Hill recorded Point of Departure, a jazz record that still feels vital and futuristic. 

Two years before Hill passed away, he appeared on Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz in 2005. In many ways it’s a miraculous piece of radio not for the least of which his colorful, angular playing but also because Hill spoke with a sometimes debilitating stutter. But here Hill sounds so relaxed at the piano and with McPartland on the other side of the microphone — NPR arts editor Tom Cole once told me it was the most clear conversation had ever heard with the pianist. After 7 years of producing Piano Jazz for NPR.org, it remains my favorite episode. — Lars

Listen: Andrew Hill on Piano Jazz

Photo: Jimmy Katz

Ditto what I say up there. 

nprmusic

nprmusic:

Hear 16 concerts from this past weekend’s Newport Jazz Festival, including sets from Miguel Zenón’s Rayuela Quartet, the Jack DeJohnette All-Stars, Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society, Three Clarinets (featuring Anat Cohen), Jenny Scheinman and Bill Frisell, and many more.

Photos: Erik Jacobs for NPR

I web-produced this thing from the comfort of my desk (and a package of Twizzlers) in Washington, D.C. You’d do well to download the Darcy James Argue set — the Brooklyn Babylon suite reminded me of everything from “Where the Streets Have No Name” to Mingus to “All My Friends” to a brief minute of Sabbath-ian doom.

Few bands have as much Bane-like brawn and brutality as Ehnahre, and much like the heady Knightfall villain (oh, he was in some recent movie, too?), Ehnahre makes some hellishly heady metal. Old Earth, the band’s third album, is somehow even more damaged and evil, equal parts Obscura-era Gorguts and Peter Broztmann’s obliterating Machine Gun slowed to a death crawl.